Biotechnological route for sustainable succinate production utilizing oil palm frond and kenaf as potential carbon sources

Abdullah Amru Indera Luthfi, Shareena Fairuz Abdul Manaf, Rosli Md Illias, Shuhaida Harun, Abdul Wahab Mohammad, Jamaliah Md Jahim

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Due to the world’s dwindling energy supplies, greater thrust has been placed on the utilization of renewable resources for global succinate production. Exploration of such biotechnological route could be seen as an act of counterbalance to the continued fossil fuel dominance. Malaysia being a tropical country stands out among many other nations for its plenty of resources in the form of lignocellulosic biomass. To date, oil palm frond (OPF) contributes to the largest fraction of agricultural residues in Malaysia, while kenaf, a newly introduced fiber crop with relatively high growth rate, holds great potential for developing sustainable succinate production, apart from OPF. Utilization of non-food, inexhaustible, and low-cost derived biomass in the form of OPF and kenaf for bio-based succinate production remains largely untapped. Owing to the richness of carbohydrates in OPF and kenaf, bio-succinate commercialization using these sources appears as an attractive proposition for future sustainable developments. The aim of this paper was to review some research efforts in developing a biorefinery system based on OPF and kenaf as processing inputs. It presents the importance of the current progress in bio-succinate commercialization, in addition to describing the potential use of different succinate production hosts and various pretreatments–saccharifications under development for OPF and kenaf. Evaluations on the feasibility of OPF and kenaf as fermentation substrates are also discussed.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3055-3075
Number of pages21
JournalApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume101
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Hibiscus
Succinic Acid
Oils
Carbon
Malaysia
Biomass
Fossil Fuels
Conservation of Natural Resources
Fermentation
Carbohydrates
Costs and Cost Analysis
Growth
Research

Keywords

  • Hydrolysis
  • Kenaf
  • OPF
  • Pretreatment
  • Succinate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Biotechnological route for sustainable succinate production utilizing oil palm frond and kenaf as potential carbon sources. / Luthfi, Abdullah Amru Indera; Manaf, Shareena Fairuz Abdul; Illias, Rosli Md; Harun, Shuhaida; Mohammad, Abdul Wahab; Jahim, Jamaliah Md.

In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 101, No. 8, 01.04.2017, p. 3055-3075.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

Luthfi, Abdullah Amru Indera ; Manaf, Shareena Fairuz Abdul ; Illias, Rosli Md ; Harun, Shuhaida ; Mohammad, Abdul Wahab ; Jahim, Jamaliah Md. / Biotechnological route for sustainable succinate production utilizing oil palm frond and kenaf as potential carbon sources. In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 2017 ; Vol. 101, No. 8. pp. 3055-3075
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